JANUARY AND FEBRUARY WE ARE FOCUSSING ON ORAL HEALTH

By December 13, 2017Uncategorized

~ BOOK YOU PET A COMPLIMENTARY DENTAL EXAM TODAY~

~Special pricing on any dental procedure booked in the months of January and February~

Dental disease not only affects your pet’s oral health it can affect their vital organs as well. As dental disease progresses the gums become more inflamed, they start to pull away from the teeth, creating pockets that trap more bacteria. As the pockets deepen the bacteria can attack the roots and the gums may start to bleed. Once this happens the bacteria can enter your pet’s bloodstream and travel to the major organs in the body and start infections there. The bacteria can affect the lungs, heart, kidneys and liver.
Before your pet develops tartar build up or dental disease one of the most effective ways to reduce dental issues in our pets is by brushing their teeth before they become a problem. If they already have problems then a cleaning under anesthetic, plus or minus extractions, will be required to correct any problems
Here are a few links to help get you started with the brushing…

Dogs:

Click here for an article on Brushing Teeth in Dogs

Cats:

Click here for an article on Brushing Teeth in Cats

WHAT IS INVOLVED IN A DENTAL CLEANING?

First, your pet receives a full physical exam to assess the conditions of the teeth and gums, and to ensue he/she is fit to undergo a general anesthetic. Your veterinarian recommends certain pre-anesthetic tests, such as blood work and a urinalysis to detect any pre-existing conditions which may affect your pet’s response to anesthesia. Antibiotics may also be prescribed.
In order to fully examine, scale and polish all tooth surfaces both above and below the gum line a general anesthetic is required. This is done by giving a short acting intravenous anesthetic, followed by tracheal intubation and maintenance on oxygen and gaseous anesthetic until the work is completed. During the whole procedure your pet’s blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rates are monitored closely.

An intravenous catheter is place in the front leg and fluids are given to maintain your pet’s blood pressure and to administer certain medications. Your pet will also be wrapped up in a circulating warm water blanket to help keep them warm.
Scaling will be done by hand by a Registered Animal Health Technologist, under and below the gum line for minor tartar build-up and by ultrasonic scaler on the tooth for more major build-up. Dental X-rays will be taken and the teeth are then polished with a fluoride paste and the mouth is rinsed with an antibacterial wash. If teeth are abscessed, or have marked gingival recession they will be extracted by a Veterinarian after a nerve block has been instilled. If circumstances dictate, gums may be sutured.
Once the dental is complete your pet will be watched closely until fully recovered in a quiet heated room.

~CARING FOR YOUR PETS~

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